Tag Archives: Constance Lytton

finding Christ in prison – Helen Sprott and Fred Hankinson

Why did militant women’s disillusionment with the Church bring deliberate provocation and rage, and why was the Church made such a target (although far from the only one)? The answer lies partly in personal experiences, especially those of suffragette prisoners, … Continue reading

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the women’s muse – Olive Schreiner

No one writer can represent, or be the focus, of a whole movement.  This is certainly true for first-wave feminism.  As it moved from what Jane Rendall (in The Origins of Modern Feminism) called ‘dynamic evangelicalism’ into a more ‘secular … Continue reading

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force fed but free – Constance Lytton

Some of the most poignant and harrowing accounts of suffragette activity and suffering are found in the book Prisons and Prisoners, written by Constance Lytton and published in 1914.  It is witness to a remarkable gentle and compassionate woman who, … Continue reading

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the Church League for Women’s Suffrage – Claude and Gertrude Hinscliff

Without the involvement of religious people, it is hard to see how first-wave feminism could have advanced.  It owed so much to religious motivation and networks and also needed religious support in order to break through into quarters which were … Continue reading

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